Sourdough FAQ Recipes
David's Wheat and Rye Bread
# From dadams@cray.com

                David's Wheat and Rye Bread.
 
I will pick up the recipe assuming you start with 4 cups of culture
>from  the first proof of the Russian starter.  (Since all the
recipies begin the same way.)  I doubled the recipe; the one I
modified this from started with 2 cups of culture.
 
 
                Ingredients
 
                4 cups culture from the first proof
                2 tablespoons dark molasses (I have skiped the molasses)
                2 tablespoons honey (I have skiped the honey)
                1 cup milk  (I have used water)
                2 teaspoons ground coriander
                2 teaspoons salt
                3-4 cups finely milled rye flour
                3-4 cups finely milled whole wheat flour
                (The total here should be between 7-8 cups.)
 
        Note:  The recipe I modified called for 2 cups rye 2 cups wheat
        and 3 cups white.  I use the K-TEC kitchen mill and mill my
        own flour from grain.  I have recommendations on buying grain
        if you are interested.  I can also pass on information about
        K-TEC.  ( K-TEC has a toll free number  1-800-748-5400.)
 
        Note 2:  The recipe I modified called for 4 tablespoons of
        vegetable oil.  I omited it and I liked the results.
 
Directions:
 
1.      Warm the milk to lukewarm
2.      Add Milk, molasses, honey, salt and coriander to the culture
        in a large mixing bowl and mix briefly.
3.      Add most of the flour and mix well.  Add flour until too stiff
        to mix by hand.  Then turn onto a floured table and knead in
        the remaining flour until satiny.  (I knead about 15 min.)
4.      I have made loaves in regular bread pans and also laid loaves
        on a greased baking sheet.  If you use the baking sheet I think
        the loaf needs to be stiffer.  Proof at 85 deg F for 2 or 3
        hours.
5.      Bake at 350 deg. F. for about 40 minutes.  Cool on a wire rack.
6.      I find that the slicing properties improve after the bread has
        a chance to sit and gel for a day or two.  I slice the bread
        very thinly, about 3/16 of an inch thick.  The bread could
        be sliced thinner but my shaky hands can't manage it.